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March Fitness Tips

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Jones, with the 169th Fighter Wing safety office at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, South Carolina Air National Guard, conducts his workout in the base gym, Feb. 25, 2014.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Caycee Watson/Released)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Jones, with the 169th Fighter Wing safety office at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, South Carolina Air National Guard, conducts his workout in the base gym, Feb. 25, 2014. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Caycee Watson/Released)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Jones, with the 169th Fighter Wing safety office at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, South Carolina Air National Guard, conducts his workout in the base gym, Feb. 25, 2014.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Caycee Watson/Released)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Jones, with the 169th Fighter Wing safety office at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, South Carolina Air National Guard, conducts his workout in the base gym, Feb. 25, 2014. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Caycee Watson/Released)

MCENTIRE JOINT NATIONAL GUARD BASE, S.C. -- Cable Incline Pushdown
1. Lie on incline bench facing away from a high pulley machine that has a straight-flat bar attachment.
2. Grasp the flat bar attachment overhead with palms pronated (overhand or palms down), shoulder width grip and extend arms out in front of you. The bar should be around 2-3 inches away from your upper thighs.
3. Keeping your upper arms stationary lift your arms back until they are straight over your head, making sure to take a deep breathe here.
4. Slowly go back to the starting position using your lats and hold the contraction once you reach the starting position. Make sure you breathe out during the execution of the exercise.

Exercise and stress relief

Exercise increases your overall health and your sense of well-being, which puts more pep in your step every day. Exercise also has some direct stress-busting benefits.

·It pumps up your endorphins. Physical activity helps to bump up the production of your brain's feel-good neurotransmitters called endorphins.

·It's meditation in motion. Even after just a 30 minute workout, you'll often find that you forgot the day's irritations and concentrated only on your body's movements. As you begin to regularly shed your daily tensions through movement and physical activity, you may find that this focus on a single task, with the resulting energy and optimism, can help you remain calm and clear in everything that you do.

·It improves your mood. Regular exercise can increase self-confidence and lower the symptoms associated with mild depression and anxiety. Exercise can also improve your sleep, which is often disrupted by stress, depression and anxiety. All this can ease your stress levels and give you a sense of command over your body and your life.