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August Retiree's Corner

Retirees from the South Carolina Air National Guard gather for their monthly luncheon at the Fort Jackson NCO Club on Feb. 7, 2020.

Retirees from the South Carolina Air National Guard gather for their monthly luncheon at the Fort Jackson NCO Club on Feb. 7, 2020, to keep in touch with each other and receive briefings on the work currently being done for Airmen at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, S.C. (U.S. Air National Guard courtesy photo).

MCENTIRE JOINT NATIONAL GUARD BASE, S.C. --

This will be my eighth Desert Storm article honoring the Desert Shield/Storm call-ups, and the fifth of ten articles honoring the 169th Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron. I have expanded more key personnel and my goal is to name and honor as many people as I possibly can in this article and subsequent articles.

As stated in my previous articles, since the 169th Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (CAMS) did such a magnificent job during the Desert Shield/Storm deployment that it caught much attention and raised some eyebrows, command wise, even though our deployed wing commander, Gen. Hal Hornberg was initially not impressed with the 169th CAMS appearances, hence the name he gave them “The Goatherders” which was a battle cry for the 169th guys, and it worked. The 169th CAMS had the best Fully Mission Capable (FMC) rating in the entire theatre of operations with an overall 88 percent rating. The Air Force standard and average is 80 percent. So under the austere and bare base conditions flying the oldest F-16s in the Air Force inventory the rating was even more impressive. So let’s do some math: we deployed 24 planes, 43 pilots and a daily requirement of 36 sorties during combat operations, not mentioning one plane was in phase dock at all times. From the beginning while at Al Kharj, 18 of our 24 planes received phase dock inspections. So the 169th CAMS had to muster up a turnaround of planes daily. Later during the war phase, it was harder getting spares to replace the aborts and a number of times the mission was performed with one or two planes short due to the quick turnaround time of the missions and all the other on-going, spur of the moment maintenance issues. Also there 17 engine changes performed by the 169th CAMS. Reading the daily logs, I was impressed with the folks who were assigned to build ‘wing tanks’, once they got going they were producing 18-22 per day, finally they had such a built up they stopped around the 260 number. I don’t know who was in charge of that operation. But whoever it was should be commended!

As mentioned in my previous articles there were very few names of individuals mentioned in the daily reports, other than the lead pilot of each mission and A/C tail number. There were some hydrazine accidents and 169th CAMS came up with a hydrazine response team headed up by Tech. Sgt. James R. Griggs. Master Sgt. Charlie Dixon spotted a pulled lanyard on a CBU-52 bomb which brought in the EOD team to remove the fuse from the bomb. On day nine of combat operations, Aircraft #322, piloted by Jay Johnson (Shaggy) experienced and received some shrapnel damage during a bombing run. Later Senior Master Sgt. David K. Wilson took two hours and $20.00 worth of speed tape to repair the damage on A/C 322.

This month’s article we are honoring the next group of 47 men and women who were deployed during the Desert Shield/Storm call-up. Their rank is what they were at the time of deployment and any other pertinent information I have about them, in addition to their rank when they retired, were discharged or passed away. They are as follows:

-Staff Sgt. Irvin Holmes retired in 2002 as a Master Sgt. At this time we believe he is still living.

-Master Sgt. Charles E. Housand retired in 1994 as a Master Sgt. He was a technician and a licensed pilot. He went back home to Loris, SC and passed away December 10, 2016. His name is on the SCANG Monument.

-Staff Sgt. Darral G. Housand retired in 2005 as a Master Sgt. He also helped out CE by working on the Congaree National Park Visitor Center. He is still living.

-Staff Sgt. Archie W. Hudson retired in 1999 as a Tech Sgt. He is Rock Hudson’s dad. After retirement he went to work for the CE Grounds Maintenance Shop as a state employee. He is still living.

-Tech Sgt. James F. Hudson, Jr. retired in 1997 as a Master Sgt. A this time I have no other information about him.

-Staff Sgt. Robert E. Hudson “Rock” transferred to the NCANG in 2002. A weapons guy, he has been attending our luncheons.

-Staff Sgt. Aubrey L. Hunt, II transferred to the Air Force Reserves in 1991.

-Airman James A. Hutto, III retired in 2012 as a Tech. Sgt. At this time I have no other information about him.

-Senior Master Sgt. Robert L. Hutto retired in 2003 as a Chie Master Sgt. He is still living and is one of my email buddies.

-Master Sgt. Robert L. Hux retired in 1991 as a Master Sgt. He was one of the oldest call-up folks. He was a technician and he passed away this year, February 13, 2021. His name is not on the SCANG Monument yet.

-Master Sgt. Robert L. Hux, Jr., he retired in 2016 as a Chief Master Sgt. He is still living.

-Staff Sgt. John R. Ingle, Jr. transferred to the Air Reserves Personnel Center (ARPC) in 1992.

-Staff Sgt. Robert D. Jacobs “Jake” retired in 2019 as a Senior Master Sgt. He is still living.

-Tech. Sgt. Carl A. James. We think he retired in 2003, but do not have concrete proof that he did.

-Staff Sgt. William Jeffcoat retired in 1998 as a Staff Sgt. He passed away September 2, 2015 and his name is on the SCANG Monument.

-Staff Sgt. Philip N. Jeffers transferred out in 2000, not sure where.

-Master Sgt. Joseph A. Jefferson retired in 2005 as a Senior Master Sgt. a weapons guy, still alive and kicking!

-Tech. Sgt. David C. Jennens transferred to CE Fuels Maintenance Shop and did retire in 1994.

-Sgt. Charles E. Jernigan transferred to the Air Reserves Personnel Center in 1992.

-Staff Sgt. Donald K. Johnson passed away in 1999 while still an active member.

-Staff Sgt. Burman H. Jones, III At this time I have no information on him.

-Staff Sgt. David M. Joos retired in 2011 as a Senior Master Sgt. was the Munitions NCOIC before retiring and is still living.

-Airman Brian L. Karr was discharged in 1995.

-Tech. Sgt. James B. Kirk retired in 1996 as a Tech. Sgt. He lives in Lancaster and is still living.

-Airman 1st Class Evans J. Kohn, Jr. retired in 2015 as a Senior Master Sgt. As far as we know he is still living.

-Chief Master Sgt. Joseph F. Kopack retired in 1997 as a Chief Master Sgt. He was the Avionics NCOIC during Desert Storm and is still living.

-Airman 1st Class Domingo E. Kullberg. At this time I have no information on him.

-Master Sgt. Robert J. Landrum retired in 1996 as a Senior Master Sgt. He went straight from Dentsville High to McEntire retiring from there. He passed away recently, May 17, 2021, coincidently my wife graduated high school with both he and his wife in 1956. We attended his funeral.

-Tech. Sgt. Terry R. Langhus retired in 1995 as a Tech. Sgt. He passed away July 5, 2008 and his name is on the SCANG Monument.

-Master Sgt. Lawrence P. Lasseigne. At this time, I can’t tell if he either was discharged or retired in 1991.

-Staff Sgt. Paul W. Laymon commissioned later on and is now a Lt. Col. And currently the 169th Security Forces Squadron Commander.

-Sgt. William C. League “Bucky” was discharged in 1996. He just passed away, May 22, 2021. A one-term member, I understand he was one of our crew chiefs during Desert Storm.

-Staff Sgt. David S. Lee retired in 2012 as a Staff Sgt. Other than that I have no other information on him.

-Tech. Sgt. James M. Lee retired in 1997 as a Tech. Sgt. Other than that I have no other information on him.

-Staff Sgt. Robert G. Lee, Jr. retired in 2002 as a Master Sgt. One of our weapons guys, still living and is one of our lunch bunch!

-Master Sgt. Jackie P. Lemacks retired in 1992 as a Master Sgt. He was NCOIC of Programs and Mobility during Desert Storm. He was a former Navy guy, moved to the Blackville area and passed away December 7, 2015.  His name is on the SCANG Monument.

-Staff Sgt. John Curtis Lever retired in 2011 as a Senior Master Sgt. He passed away recently, August 25, 2020, and his name is on the SCANG Monument.

-Tech. Sgt. Dennis C. Lewis retired in 2010 as a Senior Master Sgt. Other than that, I have no other information on him.

-Staff Sgt. William E. Lewis was discharged in 1996.

-Tech. Sgt. Jewell F. Lillard retired in 1997 as a Tech. Sgt. He passed away July 23, 2012 and his name is on the SCANG Monument.

-Tech. Sgt. Nathan R. Lindler retired in 1998 as a Master Sgt. Other than that, I have no other information on him.

-Staff Sgt. David S. Link transferred to the Air Reserves Personnel Center in 1992.

-Airman David J. Locklear was discharged in 1992.

-Airman Michael J. Locklear was discharged in 1994. The Locklears may have been brothers.

-Staff Sgt. James R. Long retired in 2013 as a Senior Master Sgt. was the lead crew chief on Plane 288 during Desert Storm. I’m not sure if he is still living or not.

-Staff Sgt. Karl S. Long, III was discharged in 1991.

-Tech. Sgt. Frank H. Love retired in 2003 as a Senior Master Sgt. One of our Munitions guys, other than that, I have no further information about him.

Statistics for this article, we have 29 people out of the 47 in this article who later became retirees, we have two that are still active members. The rest were discharged, transferred, or unknown. The 29 known folks that became retirees represents almost 62 percent of these people featured in this article. The breakdown of the 29 retired folks by rank are three chief master sergeants, nine senior master sergeants, eight master sergeants, seven technical sergeants, and two staff sergeants; totaling the 29 known retirees. The running total of the 380 folks honored thus far for deploying to Desert Storm, 264 have become retirees, a few are still active members, but should be retiring in the near future, that represents a total of 69.5 percent of these deployed folks becoming retirees thus far. The breakdown by retired rank is as follows: two major generals, four brigadier generals., 13 colonels, 14 lieutenant colonels, eights majors, 42 chief master sergeants, 44 senior master sergeants, 90 master sergeants, 39 technical sergeants, seven staff sergeants, and one senior airman for a total of 264 known retired members.

Other deployments or significant happenings during the month of August:

First Annual Field training for SCANG, 1947 at Congaree Air Base

First visit by a Governor of S.C. to an annual field training, Fritz Hollings, 1958

First member to retire from SCANG, Master Sgt., Alton G. Cox. 1963

First Black Member, John “Chick” Watson, in 1964, he retired in 1988

First ANG Unit to deploy to England in 1978.

The top and key personnel based on several after action reports and listings that I was privileged to get from several sources.  They are as follows:

Deputy Commander for Maintenance: Lt. Col. Edwin W. Fisher

Commander: Maj. Charles E. Savage

First Sergeant: Chief Master Sgt. Jerry C. Couch

Organizational Maintenance: Maj. Russell A. Rushe, OIC and Chief Master Sgt. John T. Bowie, NCOIC

Administration Branch: Maj. John V. Harsey, OIC and Senior Master Sgt. Samuel H. Ezzell, NCOIC

Munitions Branch: Capt. David S. Cregger, OIC and Chief Master Sgt. Thomas A. Marshall, NCOIC

Field Maintenance: 1st Lt. Leroy Williams, OIC and Chief Master Sgt. Leo A. Chapmon, NCOIC

Avionics Maintenance: Chief Master Sgt. Joseph F. Kopak, NCOIC

Plans & Scheduling: Senior Master Sgt. Robert E. Berry, NCOIC

Quality Control: Chief Master Sgt. William D. Cliett, NCOIC (although he wasn’t deployed)

Management Analysis: Master Sgt. Charles E. Couch, NCOIC

Programs & Mobility: Master Sgt. Jackie P. Lemacks, NCOIC

Training Management: Master Sgt. Corel C. Sweat, NCOIC

Flight & Lead Crew Chiefs:

A Flight: Senior Master Sgt. Vitalis G. Viavoda

Aircraft 288: Staff Sgt. James R. Long

      “        290: Tech. Sgt. Pat Miller

      “        291: Tech. Sgt. Danny Ward

      “        292: Tech. Sgt. William B. Mustard

      “        293: Master Sgt. Charles E. Dickson

      “        294: Tech. Sgt. Wallace Barry Ward

      “        295: Tech. Sgt. William H. Dimsdale, Jr.

      “        532: Staff Sgt. Kenneth E. Fowler

B Flight: Senior Master Sgt. Eugene Tucker

Aircraft 296: Tech. Sgt. Michael D. Brazell

       “      297:  Master Sgt. James P. Christopher, Jr.

       “      299:  Master Sgt. Albert L. Maw

       “      302:  Tech. Sgt. Albert L. Atkins

       “      304:  Master Sgt. Frederick S. Deshong

       “      305: Tech. Sgt. Dennis D. Burton

       “      306: Tech. Sgt. Hattie R. Monson

       “      308: Staff Sgt. Claude A. Shealy, Jr.

       “      312: Tech. Sgt. James A. Taylor

       “      314: Tech. Sgt. William D. Delavan, Jr.

C Flight: Master Sgt. Julian C. Tanner

Aircraft 317: Tech. Sgt. Steven L. Tanner

       “      319: Tech. Sgt. William L. Allen

       “      320: Tech. Sgt. James D. Turner

       “      321: Master Sgt. Archie S. Thorpe, Jr.

       “      322: Tech. Sgt. Gerard C. McKervey

       “      325: Tech. Sgt. Phillip H. Chandler

Last article I did a notation list of aircraft based on how many times they made the daily reports, whether it was phase dock inspections, aborts, or other maintenance problems. It has no reflections of anything, just my own notations of the various planes and how many mentions or notations were about them in the daily reports. 

Last article I did A Flight planes, this article B Flight:

Aircraft # 296 - 3 notations, the least of all notations during combat operations.

Aircraft # 297 - 20 notations

Aircraft # 299 - 13 notations

Aircraft # 302 -  17 notations

Aircraft # 304 -  8 notations

Aircraft # 305 -  18 notations

Aircraft # 306 -  19 notations

Aircraft # 308 -  5 notations

Aircraft # 312 -  22 notations

Aircraft # 314 -  15 notations