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SCANG Launches Airfield Pavements Project - Phase II

Construction is taking place on the flight line at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, S.C., Sept. 5, 2012. The ramp where the 157th Fighter Squadron's F-16 Fighting Falcons park is being demolished for a complete renovation.
(National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Caycee R. Watson/Released)

Construction is taking place on the flight line at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, S.C., Sept. 5, 2012. The ramp where the 157th Fighter Squadron's F-16 Fighting Falcons park is being demolished for a complete renovation. (National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Caycee R. Watson/Released)

MCENTIRE JOINT NATIONAL GUARD BASE, South Carolina --      McEntire has begun the second phase of upgrading its aircraft parking apron. The project is expected to increase the structural capacity and longevity of the airfield pavement in the goal of meeting current and future criteria.
    
     Lt. Col. Michael T. Dotson, 169th Base Civil Engineer, said, "Most of the existing pavements may appear cosmetically adequate from the surface. However, they were designed for 2nd and 3rd generation legacy fighter aircraft. They do not meet criteria for our currently assigned F-16 aircraft or the emerging weapons platforms coming off the assembly line that we hope will be based right here at McEntire in the future," he said.
    
     McEntire has taken incremental steps to recapitalize the mission-essential airfield pavements from which the SCANG can project its combat air power and protect the homeland more safely and effectively.
    
     "The first phase of the runway project focused primarily on the take-off and landing surfaces, taxiway system, and some parking pavement replacement, as well as the airfield lighting and aircraft arresting system repairs," said Dotson. "This project focuses on the remainder of the aircraft parking pavements only."
    
     One emphasis of the current project is to repair the existing cracked slabs, which can contribute to FOD concerns and potential risks for flight safety. The aircraft parking apron concrete slabs will be thicker to accommodate the heaviest fighter aircraft in the current inventory (F-15E) and next generation aircraft (F-35A). 
    
     Dotson said, "This latest investment will enable the US Air Force's best Fighter Wing to demonstrate and deliver its capabilities, while providing sovereign options to Combatant Commanders undisrupted for years to come."