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HISTORY OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA AIR NATIONAL GUARD

Posted 8/15/2013 Printable Fact Sheet
 
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F-104 - Starfighter
F-104 fighter on the ramp at the South Carolina Air National Guard Base, Congaree Air Field. 1960's era photo.
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Formed in 1946, the South Carolina Air National Guard consists today of more than 1,500 Airmen who work and drill at McEntire Joint National Guard Base. The 2,400 acre base is located about 12 miles east of Columbia.

The base was named for the late Brigadier General Barnie B. McEntire, Jr., the first commander of the SCANG and its first general officer. McEntire died in 1961 when he rode his malfunctioning F-104 into the Susquehanna River to avoid crashing in densely-populated Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The base previously was known as Congaree Air Base and was used in World War II as a U.S. Marine Corps training base.

About 900 of those assigned to the SCANG are traditional guard members who leave their full-time roles as civilian employees and students to train part-time with the Air National Guard. About 300 federal employees serve as full-time technicians at McEntire and drill with their respective Air National Guard units. More than 100 Active Guard Reserve personnel are integrated throughout the full-time forces of McEntire and nearly 50 state employees work at McEntire (some of whom also are members of the Air National Guard). About 90 active-duty Airmen round out the SCANG's Total Force wing, as McEntire is home to the largest Active Association program in the nation's Combat Air Forces. More than 1,000 Army National Guard personnel also work and drill at McEntire.

The primary unit of the SCANG is the 169th Fighter Wing. It is comprised of the 169th Operations Group, which include the 157th Fighter Squadron and the 245th Air Traffic Control Squadron, the 169th Maintenance Group, the 169th Mission Support Group and the 169th Medical Group. The 245th ATCS provides for the base's air traffic control services and possesses the ability to perform this service at other fixed bases and remote sites.

The mission of the 169th FW is to maintain wartime readiness and the ability to mobilize and deploy expeditiously to carry out tactical air missions or combat support activities in the event of a war or military emergency. More specifically, the wing specializes in the Suppression and Destruction of Enemy Air Defenses. The SCANG operates as part of the Total Force of the U.S. military and is fully integrated with the active-duty Air Force to perform its military mission.

The wing flies the F-16 Fighting Falcon, a single-seat, multi-purpose fighter with the ability to fly up to twice the speed of sound. It is capable of performing air-to-air and air-to-ground tactical missions. The 169th FW flew the F-16A from 1983 to 1994 and in 1994, transitioned to the F-16C/Block 52 (the newest, most advanced F-16 in the U.S. Air Force).

The SCANG's state mission is to respond to the call of the governor in the event of natural disaster or domestic disturbance.

Over the past six decades, the SCANG has been called to active military service for numerous historic contingencies. In 1950, SCANG Airmen were called to serve during the Korean War at various installations in the United States and abroad. In late 1961, the SCANG was called to active duty during the Berlin Crisis, and the 169th Tactical Fighter Group was stationed at Moron, Spain. In late 1990, units of the SCANG were activated and deployed to Saudi Arabia for Operation Desert Shield/Storm, flying 2,000 combat missions and dropping four million pounds of munitions, while maintaining the highest aircraft mission capable rate in the theater.

In 2002, aircraft and personnel from the 169th FW deployed to Southwest Asia in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and participated directly in combat operations. Also that year, 50 SCANG Airmen, then assigned to the 240th Combat Communications Squadron, deployed to Manas Air Base, Kyrgystan for six months in support of the Global War on Terrorism. The 245th ATCS deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

In 2003, nearly 400 Airmen from the 169th FW and all its F-16s were mobilized and deployed to Southwest Asia as part of what became Operation Iraqi Freedom. The 169th FW was attached to the 379th Air Expeditionary Wing, stationed in Qatar. The deployed contingent flew more than 400 combat missions, performing the Suppression and Destruction of Enemy Air Defenses mission and flying numerous precision bombing missions over Iraq.

Over the years, the 169th FW deployed for Operation Southern Watch, (Qatar, 1996), Operation Northern Watch (Turkey, 2000) and again for Southern Watch (Saudi Arabia, 2001). This made the 169th FW the first Air National Guard unit to deploy alongside active-duty Air Force units to comprise an Air Expeditionary Force.

In 2005, the Base Realignment and Closure Commission announced an historic expansion at McEntire. Five more F-16s would arrive at the base in 2006 and five more the following year. Then in 2007, Regular Air Force personnel began arriving at McEntire as the base prepared to host and operate the largest Active Association unit in the nation's Combat Air Forces, bringing about 150 active duty personnel on board to work, train and deploy with the 169th FW.

Since then, the many components of the SCANG have continued to support the Global War on Terrorism and have lent their muscle to Total Force operations and Air Expeditionary Force (AEF) deployments all over the world. Airmen from the 169th Civil Engineer Squadron deployed to Southwest Asia, Airmen from the 169th Security Forces and 169th Force Support Squadron to Kyrgyzstan and the list goes on.

Meanwhile, the Swamp Fox team has maintained a rigorous pace of operations on the home front. In addition to highly rated performances in recent Phase I and Phase II Operational Readiness Inspections and achieving record outstanding scores on Standardization and Evaluation and Logistics Compliance Assessment Program inspections, McEntire also hosted the state's first-ever Air Ground Expo for the community. Plus, the 169th FW represented the U.S. and the Air Force's Central Command in the 2009 Falcon Air Meet, where it was declared the overall winner of the three-nation F-16 competition. This was the first time an Air National Guard unit was selected to participate in the event.

In 2010, thanks to the wing's groundbreaking Active Associate program, the 169th FW became the first Air National Guard unit to support an AEF mission for a full 120 days. While simultaneously deploying Airmen for Operation Enduring Freedom, the wing deployed more than 300 Airmen in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, during which the 169th FW flew more than 800 combat air patrol missions over Iraq. The unprecedented deployment also allowed the Swamp Fox team to escort the last Army combat forces out of Iraq on the last day of Iraqi Freedom (fitting, as the 169th FW had been there for day one of the operation in 2003).

The 169th FW continued its reputation of exceptional performance with an "Excellent" grade during a Unit Compliance Inspection (UCI), conducted by the Air Combat Command's Inspector General in February 2011. The 169th Medical Group followed with an "Excellent" rating during their Health Services Inspection in March 2011.

May 2011, the 169th FW accepted the Aerospace Control Alert mission from nearby Shaw AFB. As the 169th FW maintains responsibility for this vital continental air defense mission, the men and women of the SCANG remain poised and ready to support their nation and the state of South Carolina at home and abroad in the years to come.

In August 2012, the 169th FW wrapped up an historic four-month deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The Swamp Foxes added to their rich legacy as the Air Force's premier fighter wing by flying 2,194 combat sorties for 9,192.8 combat hours and never missed an ATO, thus concluding the AEF deployment with a 100 percent completion rate. The deployed unit completed 1,465 joint tactical air requests, 410 troops-in-contact and 500 Priority Taskings, 246 "shows of force," dropped 207, 500lb GBU bombs and expended 7,303 rounds of 20mm munitions.

Since August 2012, the men and women of the SCANG and the 169th FW continued building on their Swamp Fox reputation with the following achievements. In September 2012, the SCANG's Aerospace Control Alert unit "aced" their ACA mission evaluation from 1st Air Force. They followed-up this performance by passing a "No-Notice" North American Aerospace Defense Fighter Alert Force Evaluation in December. ACA, Command Post, Intelligence, Maintenance and Operations personnel all played a role in receiving "Mission Ready" in all inspection areas.

SCANG history was made in January 2013 with the promotion of Brig. Gen. Calvin Elam as the units' first black general officer.

January 2013 also kicked-off an aggressive readiness exercise schedule as the 169th FW prepares for a Certified Readiness Evaluation in September. This first-of-its-kind evaluation will benchmark the execution of future Air Force-wide inspections.

Receiving high honors, February 2013, the 245th Air Traffic Control Squadron was named the 2012 Airfield Operations Flight Complex of the year.

So far this year, various elements of the 169th FW have or are currently deployed throughout the world. Included are an elite team of 169th Security Forces personnel and their six month deployment with the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing in Southwest Asia. The 169th Civil Engineer Squadron is deployed to Ramstein Air Base, Germany, and is participating in a Silver Flag exercise.


(Current as of August 2013)








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